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Hyperspectral Camera Rikola

Hyperspectral Camera Rikola

40.000

Rikola Ltd. has developed, together with VTT, the world’s smallest and most lightweight Hyperspectral Camera. This frame based solution provides full 2D images at every exposure enabling hyperspectral stereophotogrammetry in UAVs first in the world.

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Rikola Ltd. has developed, together with VTT, the world’s smallest and most lightweight Hyperspectral Camera. This frame based solution provides full 2D images at every exposure enabling hyperspectral stereophotogrammetry in UAVs first in the world.

The Hyperspectral Camera has been tested in several measurement campaigns using various platforms: Microdrone, Mikrokopter, Infrotron and C-Astral Bramor. The camera has proven its high performance with several benefits:

  • Lightweight: < 600 g
  • Small and robust: handheld size
  • Frame based: provides full 2D images at every exposure
  • High accuracy image mosaics in low cost
  • Approx. 30 times faster than LCTF based devices

In addition to remote sensing applications, the camera has been tested also in neurosurgery microscope and chemical imaging applications.

Technical specifications

MosaicMill Ltd. 4.4.2014 3
• Weight: < 700g

• Max 24 bands by data cube in-flight or 400 bands in the office

• Spectral resolution 10 nm, FWHM

• Image resolution max. 1024 x 1024

• Spectral range: 500-900nm (spectral step 1nm)

• Total time, e.g. data cube of 16 bands – 1.6 sec

• Optical system: focal length 6 mm, Fnumber
2.7, FOV 37o

Application areas

Hyperspectral frame sensor opens new application areas for light weight UAV imaging. Pushbroom sensors have offered as wide band selection but that hardware has been too heavy for UAV applications. This camera is set to the range of 500-900nm where leaf chlorophyll content is the primary factor that affects reflectance. Biophysical and chemical analysis using high spectral resolution remote sensing data include estimating chlorophyll content, leaf area index (LAI) of forest stands, identifying species or determining reflectance of forest canopies. In agriculture this wavelength range is advantageous for crop indices like yield estimates, detection of crop diseases and flux indices. Typically hyperspectral data is processed by combining individual bands with each others. The used methods are ratio based, distance based or orthogonal indices. The main idea of ratio based indices is that while a change in illumination may change in remote sensed response, most red/IR ratios should remain unchanged for a given surface regardless of terrain effects. The new hyperspectral frame camera system very suitable for precision agriculture; land use, vegetation and forestry surveys. Its accuracy is good and the camera provides an economical option for limited payload remote sensing, compared to other hyperspectral imagers. The device and the software are being continuously developed, and the goal is to reach appropriate technology level for narrow band indices and for high accuracy remote sensing both from spatial and radiometric point of view.

Hyperspectral imaging

A great path in the development of sensors is in spectral resolution. Especially in forestry and agriculture UAV applications, the standard blue, green, red and CIR bands cannot provide the required details of the target. As a response to this shortcoming, the Finnish Technical Research Center and Rikola Ltd. have developed a frame camera that collects spectral narrow-band images with single exposure. Camera can record up to 50 bands in the range of 500-950nm. This camera will be available in 2013, creating new businessopportunities in fertiliser and pesticide optimisation, forest inventory and environmental monitoring, for example. MosaicMill is currently developing EnsoMOSAIC software to process these hyperspectral images into hyperspectral mosaics and hyperspectral 3D models.